The Douglas Archives

A collection of historical and genalogical records

Hugh Drysdale , Lt. Governor of Virginia 1722-1726

                                         Hugh Drysdale 

  Below :  photos of original  documents supposedly signed by Hugh .

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Comment by Russell Lynn Drysdale on October 17, 2021 at 2:20

http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/george1stearloforkney.htm 

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The page you requested was not found.

Please start again , 

if you copy and paste it into a browser  , it gives the proper article 

Comment by William Douglas on October 16, 2021 at 22:39

Earl of Orkney, Governor of Virginia apparently never visited Virginia
http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/george1stearloforkney.htm ;

Comment by Russell Lynn Drysdale on October 16, 2021 at 20:01
Comment by Russell Lynn Drysdale on October 16, 2021 at 19:44

https://www.facebook.com/notes/260309528751868/?pnref=lhc

Col. Spotswood , Lord Orkney George Douglas-Hamilton , Major Drysdale this is a rather long piece , about a 45 minute read . Major Drysdale is Hugh Drysdale .

Comment by Russell Lynn Drysdale on October 16, 2021 at 19:28

https://www.british-history.ac.uk/jrnl-trade-plantations/vol5/pp62-...

Paragraph 67
Virginia.
Letter from Earl of Orkney.
Councillor.
¶A letter from the Earl of Orkney, Governor of Virginia, to the Board, dated the 17th inst., recommending Mr. John Carter to be of the Council there, in the room of Colonel Bassett, deceased, was read, as also
Letter from Major Drysdale on same subject and peace with Indians.
A letter from Major Drysdale, Lieutenant Governor of Virginia, dated 1st November, 1723, upon the same subject, and transmitting Articles of Peace made by Colonel Spotswood with the Five Nations of Indians in 1722.
Representation for a new Councillor.
Ordered that the draught of a representation to His Majesty, recommending the said John Carter to be of the Council of Virginia, in the room of Colonel Bassett, be prepared.

Comment by Russell Lynn Drysdale on August 2, 2021 at 17:34

 I had more land Grants Hugh Drysdale had signed , I will have to dig around on my old PC The grant below appears to be written out to a Captain Adolphus Beverley  if you look in the middle paragraph and go down about 6 lines 

Comment by William Douglas on August 2, 2021 at 11:09

These are great finds!

Comment by Russell Lynn Drysdale on August 1, 2021 at 16:56

Comment by Russell Lynn Drysdale on August 1, 2021 at 15:07

TIMELINE
1672—1673 In one of these two years, Hugh Drysdale is born in County Kilkenny, Ireland, the son of an Anglican clergyman.
May 8, 1688 Hugh Drysdale matriculates at Trinity College, Dublin.
February 1692 Hugh Drysdale enters Queen's College, University of Oxford.
1694 With the appellation gentleman, Hugh Drysdale is commissioned an ensign and embarks on a career in the army.
1701—1703 Hugh Drysdale serves in the English army in Ireland.
1709—1713 Hugh Drysdale is a major in the English army and second in command of a marine regiment under a nephew of the duke of Marlborough.
1722 By this year, Hugh Drysdale is retired from the English army and married to a woman named Hester.
April 3, 1722 Hugh Drysdale is appointed lieutenant governor of Virginia after the king's ministers decide to replace Alexander Spotswood.
September 27, 1722 Hugh Drysdale takes the oaths of office as lieutenant governor of Virginia in Williamsburg, and with his wife Hester takes up residence in the governor's palace.
May 1723 Lieutenant Governor Hugh Drysdale summons the General Assembly and proposes reforms to the militia laws and the laws governing crimes committed by slaves, which help calm fears following rumors of an insurrection.
May 1726 Lieutenant Governor Hugh Drysdale summons the General Assembly for a second time for the dispatch of largely routine business.
July 22, 1726 Lieutenant Governor Hugh Drysdale dies in Williamsburg. He is buried in the yard of Bruton Parish Church there.
Comment by Russell Lynn Drysdale on June 27, 2021 at 15:44
Comment by Russell Lynn Drysdale on June 27, 2021 at 15:43

Making conections

The more information you can give about the people you mention, the more chance there is of someone else connecting with your family.

Dates and places of births, deaths and marriages all help to place families.

Professions also help.

'My great-grandmother mother was a Douglas from Montrose' does not give many clues to follow up! But a bit of flesh on the bones makes further research possible. But if we are told who she married, what his profession was and where the children were baptised, then we can get to work.

Maybe it is time to update the information in your profile?


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